Not Quite a Race Report

For several reasons, I have had difficulty writing a race report for the Peterson Ridge Rumble 40-miler. While I would normally spend the days following a race processing the event (what I had done poorly, what I had done well, what I liked, what I didn’t like, what worked, and what didn’t work), I spent the days following this race absorbing the events that shook the ground beneath the feet of runners all over the world in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings. My accomplishments pale in comparison to those of the elite runners who compete at Boston, but my race felt particularly insignificant in light of the attack. How could I think about the number of calories I consumed or whether or not I made the correct clothing choice while people continued to lose their lives and limbs? Now, almost two weeks later, I still do not consider my race significant and I find myself unable to focus on what seem like mundane details. I can only say that the Boston tragedy has given me added perspective and has reminded me to cherish my ability to run (or even walk for that matter). Having experienced several fairly severe and long-term injuries, I try to savor every blissful, painful, sore, tired, fast, and slow step that I am able to run. The events in Boston have only made me even more grateful.

I will say of my race that it was 40 miles. It was cold and snowed for a good portion of the distance. It was at a higher altitude (Sisters, OR) than that at which I am accustomed to running, which made my breathing labored at times. The terrain was breathtaking in places and mind-numbing in others. I ran hard, finishing in a surprising 7:03 and feeling like I could run 40 more miles. I cherished every single step that day and, in the wake of attack on Boston, I appreciate every single step a little more.

  

Sarah & me about 31 miles in (photo by Glen Tachiyama)

Sarah & me about 31 miles in (photo by Glen Tachiyama)